Chandler RxP Psychiatric Services:
Dr. Jon Chandler

Dr. Jon Chandler
Chandler RxP Psychiatric Services

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Q: What?s the difference between a psychologist, a psychiatrist and a medical psychologist?

Posted on March 3, 2014 at 2:10 PM

Haha, there has to be a joke in there somewhere!!

But, for real, this is a common question I’m asked when I tell people about the psychopharmacology program.

 

A: The simple answer is:

“not very much” and “a whole lot” …read on.

A: The complicated answer is:

A psychologist has a minimum of the following:

BA in clinical psychology, sociology, or related field

MA in psychology (can be obtained interim)

Supervised by licensed clinician for 1500 pre-doc hours

Doctorate in psychology (Either PsyD, or PhD, EdD, etc.)

Sup. by licensed psychologist for 1500 post-doc hours

Successful passing of the National Exam

In the United States that is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology, or EPPP

Successful passing of the State Ethical Exam

In California it is the California Psychology Supplemental Examination, or CPSE

Accepted application and initial fee to State of licensure

California Board of Psychology, or CA BOP

source:

Please also refer to my other post discussing the requirements that a licensed psychologist must meet prior to licensure.

 

A psychiatrist has a minimum of the following:

BA in psychology, or a related field

MD from medical school completion

Residency completion

The United States Medical Licensing Examination USMLE is a multi-part professional exam sponsored by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME)

Passing of the State medical board

Accepted application and initial fee to State of licensure

sources:

-Cloud, J. (2010). Psychology vs. Psychiatry: What’s the Difference, and Which Is Better? Time.

-http://www.usmle.org/

 

Okay, here is where it gets a bit confusing…

 

A Medical Psychologist can be a:

1-highly trained and licensed psychologist

WHO CAN PRESCRIBE PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATIONS:

With a Postdoctoral Master of Science in Psychopharmacology

Licensed psychologist by the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists

Licensed Medical Psychologist from the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners

Who prescribes psychotropic medications with consultation for the 1st 3 years, in Louisiana

OR

2-highly trained and licensed psychologist

WHO CANNOT PRESCRIBE ANY MEDICATIONS

With a Doctorate in Psychology

Board Certified Speciality from the American Board of Psychological Specialties,

A Division of the American College of Forensic Examiners

sources:

upon request.

 

CONCLUSION:

The lines between psychiatry and medical psychology are becoming blurred. Though, they are admittedly VERY different fields with different qualifications and degrees. It is this author’s belief that the blur happens from a variety of sources: depictions on television and other media outlets, misinformation, miseducation, interpretation and perception. But, the most important blur is occurring due to the nation-wide scarcity of prescribers, in general! You may have noticed the increasing amount of Nurse Practitioners, Physician’s Assistants and dun-dun-dun-dun-duuuuun… Medical Psychologists!

 

Some people prefer to call a psychologists who can prescribe a “prescribing psychologist” in Louisiana, New Mexico, Guam, Native American territories, and some state and Federal departments (currently the only places said professional can prescribe.) Makes sense, but in Louisiana, many entities, (including the ones who license folks) call a psychologist who can prescribe psychotropic medications a “medical psychologist” even using the suffix “MP.” ex-Jon Chandler, PsyD, MP

 

Other similar names have popped up over the years, including: psychopharmacologist, pharmacopsychologist, pharmacology psychologist, psychology pharmacologist, prescribing psychologist, RxP, and as discussed medical psychologist. In my opinion, the varying names for this practice may highlight the general disorganization of the field of psychology. Historically, we have not been our own best advocates…

 

Hope this clears up some misinformation, or confusion. Thanks for reading.

 

Sharing is caring,

Dr. Jon Chandler

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I started this blog because?

Posted on March 2, 2014 at 2:10 PM

I want to hold myself and other colleagues accountable for learning and implementing the material we are learning in our Post-doc Master of Science in Clinical Psychopharmacology so that we will pass the Psychopharmacology Examination for Psychologists (AKA PEP) the first go-round.

 

Here is a brief introduction to what the heck all that means!

 

A Post-doc Master of Science in Clinical Psychopharmacology is a post-doctoral degree that can only be obtained when the following prerequisites have been met:

 

Licensed clinical psychologist

BA in clinical psychology, sociology, or related field

MA in psychology (can be obtained interim)

Supervised by licensed clinician for 1500 pre-doc hours

Doctorate in psychology (Either PsyD, or PhD)

Sup. by licensed psychologist for 1500 post-doc hours

Successful passing of the National Exam

In the United States that is the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology, or EPPP

Successful passing of the State Ethical Exam

In California it is the California Psychology Supplemental Examination, or CPSE

Accepted application and initial fee to State of licensure

California Board of Psychology, or CA BOP

Preferred to be actively practicing as a psychologist

Time, dedication and money for the course work ahead

Passing of the Psychopharmacology Examination for Psychologists, the PEP

In Louisiana, it is required to become licensed as a psychologist and medical psychologist, and

Consult with a medical doctor, psychiatrist, or medical psychologist for 3 years

I hope this gives you a helpful introduction to the field of medical psychology, prescribing psychology, psychopharmacology, or otherwise known as pharmacopsychology — more on this next time!

 

Thanks for reading!

Sharing is caring,

Dr. Jon Chandler

What? Why?!

Posted on March 2, 2014 at 2:10 PM

As some of you may know, I am glutton for punishment. Or, I must be. Even after the hundreds of thousands of dollar$ in student loans, the countless hours spent studying and emotional strain gaining any degree takes on one’s life… I went back.

 

It wasn’t for the money, though, that should be a nice bump in pay, it wasn’t for the prestige that comes with prescribing rights, it wasn’t just so we could relocate to one of the best cities in the world, though that is a perk, IT IS for the accessibility I will gain to patients in need of psychological services.

 

Eventually, this website will document the tail end of my MS in psychopharmacology and the beginning of a career in the pioneering field of medical psychology. Stay tuned.

 

As always, thanks for reading.

 

Sharing is caring,

Dr. Jon Chandler

Marriage and Family

Posted on June 29, 2011 at 10:20 PM

This will be the future space for psychological blog entries.  Please contact me with any topics you might like me to discuss.

Thanks,
Dr. Chandler


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